RSS Feed

Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium – oh, what quotes!

Posted on

Great quotes to ponder from the magical movie Mr. Magorium’s Wonder Emporium….

“… as she became a grown up, she wasn’t so sure. I don’t know why grown ups don’t believe what they did when they were kids. I mean, aren’t they supposed to be smarter?  What Mahoney needed was the opportunity to prove to herself that she was something more than she believed.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

“37 seconds”
“Great. Well done. Now, we wait.”
“No. We breath. We pulse. We regenerate. Our hearts beat. Our minds create. Our souls ingest.  37 seconds well used is a lifetime.”
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

“Your life is an occasion. Rise to it.”

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Eric Applebaum: My hat’s stuck.
Molly Mahoney: Ha… looks like you’re gonna need a ladder.
Eric Applebaum: Naah. I just need to jump higher.
Molly Mahoney: Eric… that’s seven feet, at least.
Eric Applebaum: Seven feet? Really?
Molly Mahoney: At least.
Eric Applebaum: You think I should get a running start?

~~~~~~~~~~~~

Molly: Are you dying?
Mr. Magorium: Light bulbs die, my sweet, I will depart.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I’m moving comments into the main post… because I know the reality is most people won’t read the comments, but the quotes and insights are so worthy:

Posted by Nita:

“I actually love the conversation he has with Mahoney about death, and Shakespeare’s King Lear.

When King Lear dies in Act V, do you know what Shakespeare has written? He’s written “He dies.” That’s all, nothing more. No fanfare, no metaphor, no brilliant final words. The culmination of the most influential work of dramatic literature is “He dies.” It takes Shakespeare, a genius, to come up with “He dies.” And yet every time I read those two words, I find myself overwhelmed with dysphoria. And I know it’s only natural to be sad, but not because of the words “He dies.” but because of the life we saw prior to the words.

Mr. Magorium: I’ve lived all five of my acts, Mahoney, and I am not asking you to be happy that I must go. I’m only asking that you turn the page, continue reading… and let the next story begin. And if anyone asks what became of me, you relate my life in all its wonder, and end it with a simple and modest “He died.”

Advertisements

About Janet

Artist/writer with a tall ship and mystical twist, Certified Professional Life Coach (ICA), Master Kaizen-Muse Creativity Coach (KMCC), empowerment workshop leader and creativity group facilitator trainer. Outdoor enthusiast and Tall Ship sailor. Healed from breast cancer using her own tools of play, lightness, creativity, nature, thinking differently and visualization to speed the healing, and ever ever so grateful for all the wondrous people she is surrounded by.

6 responses »

  1. I also love,”Eric Applebaum: My hat’s stuck.
    Molly Mahoney: Ha… looks like you’re gonna need a ladder.
    Eric Applebaum: Naah. I just need to jump higher.
    Molly Mahoney: Eric… that’s seven feet, at least.
    Eric Applebaum: Seven feet? Really?
    Molly Mahoney: At least.
    Eric Applebaum: You think I should get a running start?”.

    Reply
  2. Thank you so much for sharing that one, Brandy!! I’ll include it in the post.. because the whole world needs to hear it. (smile)

    Reply
  3. Lindsey Something

    My favorite is…
    Molly: Are you dying?
    Mr. Magorium: Light bulbs die, my sweet, I will depart.

    Reply
  4. This movie was just fantastic, period. I realize that it was a “children’s” movie, but I enjoyed it tremendously, and I liked quite a few of the quotes. I especially loved “Your life is an occasion. Rise to it.” and the one Lindsey added… Molly: Are you dying?
    Mr. Magorium: Light bulbs die, my sweet, I will depart.

    Fantastic 🙂

    Reply
  5. Sigh. I just watched the movie again.. with milk and fresh baked cookies. So good for the soul.

    Reply
  6. I actually love the conversation he has with Mahoney about death, and Shakespeare’s King Lear.

    When King Lear dies in Act V, do you know what Shakespeare has written? He’s written “He dies.” That’s all, nothing more. No fanfare, no metaphor, no brilliant final words. The culmination of the most influential work of dramatic literature is “He dies.” It takes Shakespeare, a genius, to come up with “He dies.” And yet every time I read those two words, I find myself overwhelmed with dysphoria. And I know it’s only natural to be sad, but not because of the words “He dies.” but because of the life we saw prior to the words.

    Mr. Magorium: I’ve lived all five of my acts, Mahoney, and I am not asking you to be happy that I must go. I’m only asking that you turn the page, continue reading… and let the next story begin. And if anyone asks what became of me, you relate my life in all its wonder, and end it with a simple and modest “He died.”

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: